Cheryl A. Snyder
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Cheryl A. Snyder
Cheryl A. Snyder
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What Taxpayers Can Expect in 2017

September 21, 2016 1:51 am


We’re nearing the close of the year, when most of us will begin year-end tax planning. What, as taxpayers, can we expect in 2017?

Bloomberg BNA recently projected inflation-adjusted tax items for 2017, a handy guide for those of us hoping to get a head start on taxes—and save tax dollars. Though the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has not published information on these items yet, the Bloomberg BNA projection drew from Labor Department data.

The projected income tax rates for 2017, according to Bloomberg BNA:

Married Filing Jointly/Surviving Spouses Earning Taxable Income of:
 
$18,650 or Less - 10 percent of taxable income
Over $18,650 - $75,900 - $1,865, plus 15 percent of excess over $18,650
Over $75,900 - $153,100 - $10,452.50, plus 25 percent of excess over $75,900
Over $153,100 - $233,350 - $29,752.50, plus 28 percent of excess over $153,100
Over $233,250 - $416,700 - $52,222.50, plus 33 percent of excess over $233,250
Over $416,700 - $470,700 - $112,728, plus 35 percent of excess over $416,700
Over $470,700 - $131,628, plus 39.6 percent of excess over $470,700
 
Unmarried Individuals (Other Than Heads of Households) Earning Taxable Income of:
 
$9,325 or Less - 10 percent of taxable income
Over $9,325 - $37,950 - $932.50, plus 15 percent of excess over $9,325
Over $37,950 - $91,900 - $5,226.25, plus 25 percent of excess over $37,950
Over $91,900 - $191,650 - $18,713.75, plus 28 percent of excess over $91,900
Over $191,650 - $416,700 - $46,643.75, plus 33 percent of excess over $191,650
Over $416,700 - $418,400 - $120,910.25, plus 35 percent of excess over $416,700
Over $418,400 - $121,505.25, plus 39.6 percent of excess over $418,400

It’s important to note that taxes due on the same income decrease year to year. Say you and your spouse file jointly and have a taxable income of $233,000. In 2016, you were in the 33 percent bracket and paid $52,303 in taxes; in 2017, you will be in the 28 percent bracket (due to inflation), and pay $52,124.50 in taxes, saving $178.50, according to Bloomberg BNA’s projections.

We have the option to take whichever is higher when calculating deductions: our itemized deductions, or the standard deduction. Bloomberg BNA’s projections for standard deductions in 2017 are:

Married Filing Jointly/Surviving Spouses - $12,700
Heads of Household - $9,350
All Other Taxpayers - $6,350

Keep in mind that the IRS imposes penalties on those of us who do not furnish information on our returns, do not file a return, or do not pay taxes. Congress recently increased some of these penalties, according to Bloomberg BNA, which projects:

• Failure to File Correct Information Returns - $50 (Per Violation) / $25,000 (Maximum)
• Failure to Furnish Identifying Number - $50 (Per Violation) / $25,000 (Maximum)
• Failure to Furnish Copy to Taxpayer - $50 (Per Violation) / $25,000 (Maximum)
• Failure to Retain Copy or List - $50 (Per Violation) / $25,000 (Maximum)
• Failure to Sign Return - $50 (Per Violation) / $25,000 (Maximum)
• Failure to Be Diligent in Determining Eligibility (for American Opportunity Tax Credit, Child Tax Credit or Earned Income Credit) - $510 (Per Violation) / No Limit

“The trend toward tougher penalties continues as Congress passed legislation that may revoke the passports of taxpayers with seriously delinquent tax debt,” says George Farrah, Bloomberg BNA Tax & Accounting editorial director. “For business taxpayers, Congress has provided some degree of certainty by returning to predictable annual increases for the business property expensing limits.”

Source: Bloomberg BNA
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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